Skyscapes

Info

  • Lightscape #1 2002
    encaustic on canvas, dimensions: 180 x 88 cm

  • Lightscape #1 2002
    detail

  • Le 26 juin 5 h 30 (June 26th, 5:30) 2006-2007
    encaustic on canvas, dimensions: 170 x 196 cm

  • Skyscape #1 2003 -2004
    encaustic on canvas, 240 panels, dimensions: 1.9 x 11.1 m

  • Skyscape #1 2003 -2004
    detail

  • left to right, Skyscape #1, Le 11 juillet (July 11th)
    Centre d’exposition St Hyacinthe, Skyscapes exhibition view

  • Le 11 juillet (July 11th) 2006
    Centre d’exposition St Hyacinthe, exhibition view

  • Le 11 juillet (July 11th) 2006
    encaustic on linen blend, dimensions: 4.2 x 2.7 m

  • Le 11 juillet (July 11th) 2006
    detail

  • Le 11 juillet (July 11th) 2006
    detail

  • Le 31 juillet 11 h 30 (July 31st, 11:30) 2005
    Centre d’exposition St Hyacinthe, Skyscapes exhibition view

  • Le 31 juillet 11 h 30 (July 31st, 11:30) 2005
    encaustic on canvas, dimensions: 166 x 388 cm

  • Le 26 juin 17 h 30 (June 26th 5:30) 2007
    encaustic on canvas, dimensions:196 x 170 cm

  • Le 1 fevrier 10 h 30 (February 1st, 10:30) 2007
    encaustic on canvas, dimensions:196 x 170 cm

  • left to right, Le 26 juin 17 h 30, Le 1 fevrier 10 h 30
    Galerie d’art Outremont, Vistas exhibition view

  • Le 15 aôut 20 h 30 2007
    encaustic on canvas, dimensions: 2.5 x 2.7 m

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These paintings play between abstraction and figuration as each individual panel is a monochrome while the organized collection evokes the illusion of sky. Aspects of chance, luck and play (the puzzle) are a major part of the production. Each monochrome panel is produced by pouring wax onto the unleveled surface of the support. The gradation across each panel is due to the varying thickness of the poured encaustic – white areas are where the primed ground can be seen through the thin surface of wax. Once a number of panels are produced the construction of the illusion of sky begins. Individual panels shift within the grid as I try to find places for the most recently poured pieces. The process includes removing and redoing the poured surfaces until all the segments lock into place and a resolved “Skyscape” is produced.

The grid formation is suggestive of windowpanes in industrial buildings that fragment the view while the space between each panel is essential for the illusion of a “skyscape” to function. My intention is for the “window” to function as a portal to another place/psychological space. Interior and exterior can be confounded; the perception of our surroundings can mirror an emotional state. Gazing out the window is often an escape in moments of dreaming, longing, contemplation or in search of inspiration. Conversely, the exterior environment, weather and the power of nature can affect our interior psychological state. Clouds can evoke a mood of gloom, while the dawn can evoke optimistic sentiments, and clear blue skies, cheerfulness.

These paintings play between abstraction and figuration as each individual panel is a monochrome while the organized collection evokes the illusion of sky. Aspects of chance, luck and play (the puzzle) are a major part of the production. Each monochrome panel is produced by pouring wax onto the unleveled surface of the support. The gradation across each panel is due to the varying thickness of the poured encaustic – white areas are where the primed ground can be seen through the thin surface of wax. Once a number of panels are produced the construction of the illusion of sky begins. Individual panels shift within the grid as I try to find places for the most recently poured pieces. The process includes removing and redoing the poured surfaces until all the segments lock into place and a resolved “Skyscape” is produced.

The grid formation is suggestive of windowpanes in industrial buildings that fragment the view while the space between each panel is essential for the illusion of a “skyscape” to function. My intention is for the “window” to function as a portal to another place/psychological space. Interior and exterior can be confounded; the perception of our surroundings can mirror an emotional state. Gazing out the window is often an escape in moments of dreaming, longing, contemplation or in search of inspiration. Conversely, the exterior environment, weather and the power of nature can affect our interior psychological state. Clouds can evoke a mood of gloom, while the dawn can evoke optimistic sentiments, and clear blue skies, cheerfulness.